FrostyTech.com Heatsink Reviews and Analysis
      
TOP 5 Heat Sinks     TOP 5 Low Profile Heat Sinks     TOP 5 Liquid Coolers    
 Reviews + Articless     News     HSF Mfg's Index     Advanced Search    

Guide To Making Thermistors: Updated
Guide To Making Thermistors: Updated
  0%   
Abstract: We've had some great responses to the "How to make a thermistor out of a laptop battery". It seems there is great interest, so lets' look at a couple of points in a little more detail.

 Manufacturer  Category  Published  Author 
FrostyTech   Cooling / Heatsinks   Feb 03, 2000   Max Page  

Home > Reviews > Page: More Questions...
 5) Identifying correct thermistors in consumer probes.

In the particular temperature sensor we used, the thermistor was held in the black plastic with clear silicon, and could be clearly seen from the bottom. So visual identification wasn't very difficult - this wasn't very clear originally though. The sensor display is necessary regardless of what thermistors you happen to have. If the thermistor is encased in lots of plastic the reading won't be very good, and optimal placement will be difficult - thus removing the plastic carefully is a good idea anyway. Once the plastic is gone, the type of thermistor is clearly visible. If you are unsure of what temp sensor to get, look for the one pictured.

6) Knowing what kind of thermistor is in what kind of battery.

There are many types and makes of batteries out there, I am not aware of any sources which list the specs on the components they contain. If unwilling to try some different batteries in hopes of finding the right thermistors, look explicitly for the type of battery we used in this guide. It was made by IBM and used in their 486 Thinkpads. The part number is 66G0095.

Thermistors can also be found in many other locations, I have found them in some dead computer powersupplies for instance, and a reader pointed out that they are also in automatic transmissions monitoring fluid and parts temperatures.

7) Listing the thermistors in batteries, and in probes.

Again, there are many types of batteries and many manufacturers making sensors. Testing every brand to find the specifics is just not feasable.

This link will give an idea as to what anyone interested in attempting to tracking down specific parts within portable NiMH batteries, or sensors for that matter may face. I did a patent search on www.patents.ibm.com and found this patent relating to NiMH batteries, it's 32 pages long.....

http://www.patents.ibm.com/details?pn=US05652502__

"A smart battery device which provides electrical power and which reports predefined battery parameters to an external device having a power management system, includes: at least one rechargeable cell connected to a pair of terminals to provide electrical power to an external device during a discharge mode and to receive electrical power during a charge mode, as provided or determined by the remote device; a data bus for reporting predefined battery identification and charge parameters to the external device; analog devices for generating analog signals representative of battery voltage and current at said terminals, and an analog signal representative of battery temperature at said cell; a hybrid integrated circuit (IC) having a microprocessor for receiving the analog signals and converting them to digital signals representative of battery voltage, current and temperature , and calculating actual charge parameters over time from the digital signals, the calculations including one calculation according to the following algorithm; CAPrem =CAPFC -.SIGMA.Id .DELTA.td -.SIGMA.Is .DELTA.t+.SIGMA..epsilon.c Ic .DELTA.tc wherein .epsilon.c is a function of battery current and temperature; and Is is a function of battery temperature and CAPFC. Superimposed on this equation is reset logic, that self corrects the value of CAPFC with a capacity calculation at each full charge (EOC) and each end of full discharge. "


 Previous Page °
Heat Sink Review Index  

Table of Contents:

 1:  Guide To Making Thermistors: Updated
 2: — More Questions...

List all FrostyTech heat sinks that Frostytech tested?

Facebook RSS Feed Twitter
Resources
° Got Feedback?
° Mk.II Test Platform
° Where To Buy?
° Manufacturer Index
° Industry Dir.
° Cooling Projects
Recently Tested

Scythe Mugen 5 Rev B SCMG-5100 Heatsink Review

Gelid Tranquillo 4 Air Cooled Heatsink Review

Coolermaster Ergostand III Laptop Cooling Stand Review

Noctua NH-D9DXi4-3U LGA2011 Xeon Server/Workstation Heatsink Review

Noctua NH-L9x65 Low Profile Heatsink Review

Scythe Fuma SCFM-1000 Heatsink
...More Articles >>


Websites you may also like:
PCSTATS

Time stamped: 1:06AM, 02.22.2020
Hardware news from the Community
° ID-Cooling SE 224 XT ARGB & SE 224 XT Basic

° Optimus Foundation CPU Block (Intel)

° Optimus Signature V2 CPU Block

° Scythe Mugen 5 Black RGB CPU Cooler Review

° Alphacool Eisblock XPX Aurora Edge CPU Water Block

°  Thermal Interactions between High-power Packages and Heat Sinks

° Corsair A500 CPU Cooler Review

° Alphacool Eisbaer Aurora 360 Review

° Alphacool Eisblock XPX 1U CPU Water Block

° SilverStone PF240-ARGB Liquid Cooler Review: Value And Style

° Corsair A500 Dual Fan CPU Cooler

° Corsair iCUE QL120 RGB Triple Fan Kit with Lighting Node CORE Review

° Alphacool Eisbaer Aurora 360 CPU Digital RGB Cooler Review

° Corsair A500 Air CPU Cooler

° Corsair iCUE H115i RGB PRO XT Liquid CPU Cooler Review




FrostyTech.com
Since June 1999


Find a Heatsink / RSS Feeds
Latest Heatsink Reviews
Top 5 Heatsinks Tested
News RSS Feed
Reviews RSS Feed


Social Media
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest


FrostyTech.com Info
Feedback
Contact Us / Heatsink Submissions
Submit News
Legal
Suite 66

© Copyright 1999-2020 www.frostytech.com All Rights Reserved. Privacy policy and Terms of Use
Images © FrostyTech.com and may not be reproduced without express written permission. Current students and faculty of accredited Universities may use Frostytech images in research papers and thesis, provided each image is attributed.